Roland Oldengarm - Independent IT Contractor

Living in the coolest little capital Wellington, New Zealand!

Category: Office 365 (page 1 of 2)

How to install SharePoint patches on a multi-server farm in just three steps

Installing SharePoint patches have been an issue since forever. Over the years, the strategy from Microsoft has changed a couple of times. CU became PU’s, language packs were removed. Worst thing was when Microsoft decided to roll out patches via WSUS / Windows Update…

Then SharePoint 2016 came and Zero Downtime Patching was introduced. Reason is that Microsoft now has to patch O365 as well, and there should not be any downtime.

My initial thought was this would be amazing, but I’m slightly disappointed. Yes, you can install patches without any downtime, but it is still a very cumbersome and manual process. This video explains this very well in details. I really appreciate all the documentation and blog posts from Microsoft, but I don’t understand why in 2017 we still have to execute so many manual steps to install SharePoint patches.

Then I found SPPatchtify which solves this! Continue reading

How SPMeta2 became even more awesome

If you are an experienced SharePoint developer, you’ve probably created a lot of code to deploy and upgrade SharePoint solutions. Back in SharePoint 2007, there was zero guidance how to do this, so everyone created their own scripts to deploy WSP’s, create sites, etc.  This has caused a lot of headaches and frustration, probably one of the reasons why SharePoint is the most dreaded development platform according to Stackoverflow.

Farm solutions are still out there, but since I’ve learnt about SPMeta2 I’ve moved away from farm solutions where possible. And, SPMeta2 is now even more awesome, with incremental support!

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Microsoft Teams: My experience so far

When I heard about Microsoft Teams, I was very excited from the start. I’m using Slack a lot for GitHub projects and for some internal projects, as there is no alternative in Microsoft. Teams is positioned as a Slack competitor, and when it was available as public beta, I immediately contacted our Office 365 admin to enable it. I’ve been using it for a couple of weeks now, and I want to share my experience with you!

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A new era in SharePoint development: The SharePoint Framework (spfx)

Announced at the “Future of SharePoint” event, was the SharePoint Framework. And it is in public beta since this week! I was one of the lucky persons who had access to the internal repository, so I already had a play with it before. Unfortunately I could not blog about it, as it was under NDA. I will talk about how it will fit into the existing SharePoint development infrastructure, and start with some history 🙂

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How to deploy your SharePoint artifacts like content types, site columns, lists, and much more

This blog post is aiming at developers that are looking for a solution to deploy SharePoint artifacts from code. Sure, you can do all of this by hand via the SharePoint user interface, but that is not repeatable.

In SharePoint 2007 the recommended solution was to use the feature framework. However, that had (and still has) one big disadvantage: It is hard to upgrade existing sites. FeatureUpgradeActions were introduced in SharePoint 2010, but it is still a manual job.

In 2016, the feature framework has been deprecated in favor of using CSOM / SSOM. I’m going to look at the framework we are using for most of our SharePoint projects to make this a breeze: SPMeta2.

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How to: Send an email if a Salesforce opportunity is won using Microsoft Flow

After my blog post yesterday about Flow, I got a request from a user to build a Flow for Salesforce that does something when an Opportunity is closed, and checks if it was won or lost.

I love feedback, so I decided to build that flow. The result? Check out below email:

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A first look at Microsoft Flow: IFTTT on steroids

If you’ve followed my blog, you know I’ve been looking at PowerApps. PowerApps consists of two parts: Flows (formerly Logic Flow App) and just Apps. Flows allowed you to do things like “If someone tweets about my company, send me an email”, or “When a record is added to SalesForce, add an item to a SharePoint List”. Microsoft has now taken out Flows / Logic Flow Apps, and released it as a separate product: Flow. I think this is a good step, PowerApps can then focus on enabling power users to create mobile apps. I will briefly discuss what Flow is, and show an example of an automated tweet translator emailer. Continue reading

Part 2: Embed a Power BI Report in a SharePoint Site

This is part 2 of the blog post series: How to embed a Power BI Report in SharePoint. Please check Part 1, where I’ve shown how to embed a Power BI report in a provider hosted add-in. In this part I will show you how this report can be added to SharePoint as a custom web part. I’ve also improved the solution I built in Part 1, for example it’s also possible to embed an entire report, and not only one tile. All source code is on GitHub.

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Part 1: How to embed PowerBI in a SharePoint site

One of the most requested features for PowerBI was to be able to embed it in any web application. This has now been implemented with Power BI Embedded. An excellent demo created by Microsoft can be found here. While this is a very cool feature, it is aiming at developers. Another feature request that many of our customers have is to embed reports in a SharePoint site, e.g. to display it on an intranet.

Currently there is no out-of-the-box web part to display a PowerBI report in a SharePoint site. What I am going to show you, is how to do this with a provider hosted add-in! Continue reading

What’s changed in the new SharePoint document library UI?

One of the most important features of SharePoint is the document library. SharePoint is a document management system since 2001, so the document library is one of the key features. Initially the only instance of the document library was within team sites. In later versions and in Office 365 there are other locations to store documents, like OneDrive for Business.

The user interface of the document library hasn’t changed much since SharePoint 2007. Yes, in SharePoint 2013 drag-and-drop was introduced, the UI has been polished, but in basis the UI was the same. And the confusing part is (was?) that the document libraries in SharePoint looked different than e.g. Onedrive for Business. That has now changed! Continue reading

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